New Girl Studies Books…if that’s your thing:)

Announcing the publication of two new texts exploring girlhood:

THE GIRLS’ HISTORY & CULTURE READERS
Edited by Miriam Forman-Brunell and Leslie Paris
University of Illinois Press, 2011

The Girls’ History and Culture Readers provides scholars, instructors, and students with the most influential essays that have defined the field of American girls’ history and culture. A relatively new and energetic field of inquiry, girl-centered research is critical for a fuller understanding of women and gender, a deeper consideration of childhood and adolescence, and a greater acknowledgment of the significance of generation as a historical force in American culture and society.

THE GIRLS’ HISTORY & CULTURE READER: THE NINETEENTH CENTURY
Edited by Miriam Forman-Brunell and Leslie Paris
University of Illinois Press, 2011
978-0-252-07765-4
$25.00

Bringing together work from top scholars of women and youth, The Girls’ History and Culture Reader: The Nineteenth Century addresses topics ranging from diary writing and toys to prostitution and slavery. Covering girlhood and the relationships between girls and women, this pioneering volume tackles pivotal themes such as education, work, play, sexuality, consumption, and the body. The reader also illuminates broader nineteenth-century developments—including urbanization, industrialization, and immigration–through the often-overlooked vantage point of girls.

Contributors are Carol Devens, Miriam Forman-Brunell, Jane H. Hunter, Anya Jabour, Anne Scott MacLeod, Susan McCully, Mary Niall Mitchell, Leslie Paris, Barbara Sicherman, Carroll Smith-Rosenberg, Christine Stansell, Nancy M. Theriot, and Deborah Gray White.

THE GIRLS’ HISTORY & CULTURE READER: THE TWENTIETH CENTURY
Edited by Miriam Forman-Brunell and Leslie Paris
University of Illinois Press, 2011
978-0-252-07768-5
$25.00

Bringing together work from top scholars of women and youth, The Girls’ History and Culture Reader: The Twentieth Century illustrates girls’ centrality to major twentieth-century forces such as immigration, labor, feminism, and consumerism. While girls in the twentieth century found new avenues for personal ambition and self-expression, especially at school and in the realm of leisure and popular culture, they continued to wrestle with traditional ideas about feminine identity, socialization, and sexuality.

Contributors are Joan Jacobs Brumberg, Rachel Devlin, Susan J. Douglas, Miriam Forman-Brunell, Kyra D. Gaunt, Mary Celeste Kearney, Ilana Nash, Mary Odem, Leslie Paris, Kathy Peiss, Vicki L. Ruiz, Kelly Schrum, and Judy Yung.

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